Research Blog

Updated Citation Analysis – ‘Exploring the reach of the Census-based Longitudinal Studies 2010-2017’

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Overview

The Northern Ireland Longitudinal Study, ONS Longitudinal Study (England and Wales), and Scottish Longitudinal Study include a vast range of data relevant to many different types of research question. Their combination of administrative, census and health data across time make them a rich and unique set of resources. Examples of the types of research enabled by these features of the LSs include: Assessing the contributions of the workplace and employment history, the local area, and individual health and social factors from childhood and adulthood to extended working lifeThe role of subject choices in secondary education on further education studies and labour market outcomes and Population characteristics of stigma, condition disclosure and chronic health conditions.

As an exploration of the many ways in which the LSs have been used, CALLS have conducted an analysis of the journal papers produced by LS researchers. This citation analysis demonstrates the impressive range of academic fields to which LS-based research has contributed in the last 7 years. Research featured in over 70 journals, and spanned more than 50 Scopus subject categories.

Research based on the LSs is regularly published in top quality international peer reviewed journals such as Demography, the International Journal of Epidemiology and Population, Space and Place. Eighteen papers included in the citation analysis were published in journals ranked within the top 5 for one of the following SCImago subject areas:

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Epidemiology
  • Demography
  • Health (Social Science)
  • Urban Studies
  • Community and Home Care
  • Applied Psychology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Biotechnology

Papers had excellent citation rates indicating the unique contribution LS data offer. Forty papers had been cited 10 or more times, and 13 papers had more than 20 citations.

LS

n papers published

Total citation count

NILS 41 217 (avg 5.6)
ONS LS 70 454 (avg 7.2)
SLS 43 421 (avg 11.1)
All LSs 139 1018 (avg 8.0)

 

The subject categories of papers using the LSs reflect the strengths of the data that they offer. Whilst the categories were very similar,  ONS LS’s top 5 included ‘Demography’, whereas the SLS and NILS had a higher proportion of ‘Health (social science)’ papers, likely due to their excellent linkages with health data.

Overall the analysis shows the valuable contribution of the NILS, ONS LS and SLS to a diverse range of academic fields including medicine, demography, geography, economics, business, psychology, environmental science and more.

Although we only focus on publications in academic journals in this report, LS research has considerable impact in other formats such as briefing notes, books and presentations to government, and has also formed the basis of a variety of PhD Theses. A full list of outputs can be explored in our outputs database.

The raw data for the analysis can be downloaded at the bottom of this page.

Methods

Using the CALLS Hub outputs database a total of 139 published papers from the period January 2010 – October 2017 were identified from the three LSs. It should be noted that whilst CALLS and the RSUs actively solicit LS users to notify them of all outputs, and also conduct occasional literature searches to maximise capture, it is possible that some further papers exist.

All papers published in journals or regularly produced official publications – such as ONS Population Trends – were included. We did not include working papers in this analysis. Citation counts were gathered from Scopus, taking the final counts as of 21 November 2017. Impact Factors were taken from the Scopus project SCImago using the SJR2 indicator.

Results

The LSs combined

Of the 139 papers identified, 16 were from non-peer-reviewed journals such as Population Trends. Ten papers used more than one LS for their analysis. (see figure 1)

figure 1. Number of published papers per LS, Jan 2010 – October 2017. n = 139

Papers from the three LSs were published in a total of 73 different journals, spanning 52 SCImago Subject Categories in 13 Subject Areas (figure 2). SJR Impact Factors for the journals ranged from 0.104 to 10.113, with an average of 1.573.

figure 2: Percentage of published papers by SCImago Subject Area

figure 2: Number of LS papers published by SCImago Subject Area [CLICK TO ENLARGE]

The 5 most frequent subject categories for LS papers were:

  1. Public Health, Environment & Occupational Health (39 papers)
  2. Geography, Planning & Development (27 papers)
  3. Medicine(misc) (26 papers)
  4. Health(social science) (22 papers)
  5. Epidemiology (21 papers)

The ten most cited papers from the three LSs were:

LS year Authors Paper title Scopus Citation count Journal Journal Impact Factor
SLS 2010 van Ham, M. & Manley, D. The effect of neighbourhood housing tenure mix on labour market outcomes: a longitudinal investigation of neighbourhood effects 74 Journal of Economic Geography 3.083
ONS LS 2013 Clark, D. & Royer, H. The Effect of Education on Adult Mortality and Health: Evidence from Britain 67 American Economic Review 10.113
SLS 2011 Boyle, P., Feng, Z. & Raab, G. Does widowhood increase mortality risk? Comparing different causes of spousal death to test for selection effects 37 Epidemiology 2.382
SLS 2013 Spijker, J. & MacInnes, J. Population ageing: the timebomb that isn’t? 36 BMJ 2.064
ONS LS 2010 Grundy, E. & Tomassini, C. Marital history, health and mortality among older men and women in England and Wales 29 BMC Public Health 1.245
NILS 2011 O’Reilly, D., Rosato, M., Catney, G., Johnston, F. & Brolly, M. Cohort description: The Northern Ireland Longitudinal Study (NILS) 26 International Journal of Epidemiology 3.222
SLS 2014 Gaye, A., Marcon, Y., Iseva, J. et al DataSHIELD: taking the analysis to the data, not the data to the analysis 24 International Journal of Epidemiology 4.562
ONS LS 2013 Elliot, P., Shaddick, G., Douglass, M. et al Adult Cancers Near High-voltage Overhead Power Lines 23 Epidemiology 2.759
NILS 2010 Connolly, S., O’Reilly, D. & Rosato, M. House value as an indicator of cumulative wealth is strongly related to morbidity and mortality risk in older people: a census-based cross-sectional and longitudinal study 23 International Journal of Epidemiology 2.563
NILS, ONS LS & SLS 2010 Young, H., Grundy, E., O’Reilly, D. & Boyle, P. Self-rated health and mortality in the UK: results from the first comparative analysis of the England and Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland Longitudinal Studies 23 Population Trends 0.262

 Northern Ireland Longitudinal Study

During the period January 2010 to October 2017, a total of 41 journal papers were found which had used NILS data, including 3 paper which had used all 3 LSs and one which used the SLS and NILS. Five NILS publications appeared journals with top-5 ranked impact factor.

NILS journal papers were published in 27 different journals, spanning 13 SCImago Subject Areas and 33 Subject Categories (see below). SJR Impact Factors for the papers ranged from 0.216 to 4.914, with an average of 1.631.

figure 3: Number of NILS papers published by SCImago Subject Area

figure 3: Number of NILS papers published by SCImago Subject Area [CLICK TO ENLARGE]

The 5 most frequent subject categories for NILS papers were:

  1. Public Health, Environmental & Occupational Health (15 papers)
  2. Geography, Planning & Development (10 papers)
  3. Health(social science) (10 papers)
  4. Epidemiology (7 papers)
  5. Medicine(misc) (5 papers)

The 10 most cited NILS papers were:

year Authors Paper title Scopus Citation count Journal Journal Impact Factor
2011 O’Reilly, D., Rosato, M., Catney, G. et al Cohort description: The Northern Ireland Longitudinal Study (NILS) 26 International Journal of Epidemiology 3.222
2010 Connolly, S., O’Reilly, D. & Rosato, M. House value as an indicator of cumulative wealth is strongly related to morbidity and mortality risk in older people: a census-based cross-sectional and longitudinal study 23 International Journal of Epidemiology 2.563
2010 Young, H., Grundy, E., O’Reilly, D. & Boyle, P. Self-rated health and mortality in the UK: results from the first comparative analysis of the England and Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland Longitudinal Studies 23 Population Trends 0.262
2011 McCann, M., Donnelly, M., & O’Reilly, D. Living arrangements, relationship to people in the household and admission to care homes for older people 17 Age and Ageing 1.666
2011 McCann, M., Grundy, E. & O’Reilly, D. Why is housing tenure associated with a lower risk of admission to a nursing or residential home? Wealth, health and the incentive to keep ‘my home’ 14 Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health 1.649
2011 Connolly, S., O’Reilly, D., Rosato, M. & Cardwell, C. Area of residence and alcohol-related mortality risk: a five-year follow-up study 14 Addiction 2.220
2014 Stockdale, A. & Catney, G. A Life Course Perspective on Urban–Rural Migration: the Importance of the Local Context 12 Population, Space and Place 1.385
2010 O’Reilly, D. & Rosato, M. Dissonances in self-reported health and mortality across denominational groups in Northern Ireland 11 Social Science and Medicine 1.652
2013 O’Reilly, D. & Rosato, M. Worked to death? A census-based longitudinal study of the relationship between the numbers of hours spent working and mortality risk 11 International Journal of Epidemiology 4.187
2012 Shuttleworth, I., Barr, P.J. & Gould, M. Does Internal Migration in Northern Ireland Increase Religious and Social Segregation? Perspectives from the Northern Ireland Longitudinal Study (NILS) 2001–2007 9 Population, Space & Place 1.667

ONS LS

During the period in question, 70 journal papers were identified as having been produced from ONS LS projects (including 9 papers which also used other LSs). Of these, 14 appeared in non peer-reviewed journals. Nine papers appeared in top-5 ranked journals.

ONS LS papers appeared in 42 journals, and covered 27 SCImago Subject Categories in 9 Subject Areas. SJR Impact Factors for the journals ranged from 0.104 to 10.113 with an average of 1.443.

figure 4: Number of ONS LS papers published by SCImago Subject Area

figure 4: Number of ONS LS papers published by SCImago Subject Area [CLICK TO ENLARGE]

The most frequent subject categories in which ONS LS papers appeared were:

  1. Medicine(misc) (15 papers)
  2. Public Health, Environmental & Occupational Health (14 papers)
  3. Demography (12 papers)
  4. Geography, Planning & Development (11 papers)
  5. Epidemiology (11 papers)

The most cited ONS LS papers were:

year Authors Paper title Scopus Citation count Journal Journal Impact Factor
2013 Clark, D. & Royer, H. The Effect of Education on Adult Mortality and Health: Evidence from Britain 67 American Economic Review 10.113
2010 Grundy, E. & Tomassini, C. Marital history, health and mortality among older men and women in England and Wales 29 BMC Public Health 1.245
2013 Elliot, P., Shaddick, G., Douglass, M. et al Adult Cancers Near High-voltage Overhead Power Lines 23 Epidemiology 2.759
2010 Young, H., Grundy, E., O’Reilly, D. & Boyle, P. Self-rated health and mortality in the UK: results from the first comparative analysis of the England and Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland Longitudinal Studies 23 Population Trends 0.262
2011 Riva, M., Curtis, S., Norman, P. Residential mobility within England and urban-rural inequalities in mortality 22 Social Science and Medicine 1.819
2012 Blomgren J., Martikainen P., Grundy E. & Koskinen S. Marital history 1971-91 and mortality 1991-2004 in England & Wales and Finland 18 Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health 1.590
2011 Popham, F., & Boyle, P.J. Is there a ‘Scottish effect’ for mortality? Prospective observational study of census linkage studies 16 Journal of Public Health 0.891
2013 Scott, A.P. & Timæus, I.M. Mortality differentials 1991−2005 by self-reported ethnicity: findings from the ONS Longitudinal Study 14 Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health 1.881
2011 Webb, R.T., Marshall, C.E. & Abel, K.M. Teenage motherhood and risk of premature death: long-term follow-up in the ONS Longitudinal Study 13 Psychological Medicine 3.192
2013 Ramsay, S., Grundy, E. & O’Reilly, D. The relationship between informal caregiving and mortality: an analysis using the ONS Longitudinal Study of England and Wales 13 Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health 1.881
2013 Blackburn, C.M., Spencer, N.J. & Read, J.M. Is the onset of disabling chronic conditions in later childhood associated with exposure to social disadvantage in earlier childhood? A prospective cohort study using the ONS Longitudinal Study for England and Wales 13 BMC Pediatrics 1.119

Scottish Longitudinal Study

During the period January 2010 – October 2017, 43 SLS-based journal papers were identified (including 10 papers which also used other LSs). Of these, 2 appeared in non peer-reviewed journals. Four papers were published in top-5 ranked journals.

The SLS papers were published in 33 different journals, spanning 32 SCImago Subject Categories in 12 Subject Areas. SJR Impact Factors for the journals ranged from 0.173 to 5.895, with an average of 1.466.

figure 5: Number of SLS papers published by SCImago Subject Area

figure 5: Number of SLS papers published by SCImago Subject Area [CLICK TO ENLARGE]

SLS papers appeared most frequently under the following subject categories:

  1. Public Health, Environmental & Occupational Health (13 papers)
  2. Medicine(misc) (8 papers)
  3. Geography, Planning & Development (7 papers)
  4. Health(social science) (7 papers)
  5. Epidemiology (4 papers)
  6. Agricultural and Biological Sciences (misc) (4 papers)
  7. Biochemistry, Genetics & Molecular Biology (4 papers)

The 10 most cited SLS papers were:

year Authors Paper title Scopus Citation count Journal Journal Impact Factor
2010 van Ham, M. & Manley, D. The effect of neighbourhood housing tenure mix on labour market outcomes: a longitudinal investigation of neighbourhood effects 74 Journal of Economic Geography 3.083
2011 Boyle, P., Feng, Z. & Raab, G. Does widowhood increase mortality risk? Comparing different causes of spousal death to test for selection effects 37 Epidemiology 2.382
2013 Spijker, J. & MacInnes, J. Population ageing: the timebomb that isn’t? 36 BMJ 2.064
2014 Gaye, A., Marcon, Y., Iseva, J. et al DataSHIELD: taking the analysis to the data, not the data to the analysis 24 International Journal of Epidemiology 4.562
2010 Young, H., Grundy, E., O’Reilly, D. & Boyle, P. Self-rated health and mortality in the UK: results from the first comparative analysis of the England and Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland Longitudinal Studies 23 Population Trends 0.262
2012 Bailey, N. How spatial segregation changes over time: sorting out the sorting processes 21 Environment and Planning A 1.456
2015 Mackenbach, J.P., Kulhánová, I., Bopp, M. et al Inequalities in Alcohol-Related Mortality in 17 European Countries: A Retrospective Analysis of Mortality Registers 21 PLoS Medicine 5.895
2010 Boyle, P.J., Popham, F. & Norman, P. The Scottish excess in mortality compared to the English and Welsh: is it a country of residence or country of birth excess? 19 Health & Place 1.297
2014 Eikemo, T.A., Hoffman, R., Kulik, M.C. et al How can inequalities in mortality be reduced? A quantitative analysis of 6 risk factors in 21 European populations 17 PLoS ONE 1.545
2011 Popham, F., & Boyle, P.J. Is there a ‘Scottish effect’ for mortality? Prospective observational study of census linkage studies 16 Journal of Public Health 0.891
2013 Kulik, M.C., Menvielle, G., Eikemo, T.A. et al Educational Inequalities in Three Smoking-Related Causes of Death in 18 European Populations 16 Nicotine & Tobacco Research 1.388

Explore the full database of LS outputs

Raw data (Excel, 83kB)

Published on December 19th, 2017

SLS migration research to be enhanced with continuous GP registration data

Dawn Everington, SLS-DSU

SLS-DSU have been working on an exciting new data development which will soon be available to researchers. We have been given access to postcode of residence and date of each NHS GP registration since 1 January 2000.  This provides users with a means of locating their SLS sample continuously rather than only once every 10 years at the time of the censuses.

Besides projects primarily interested in internal migration, these data will be also useful to those investigating how the local environment affects outcomes, such as the recent project which looked at proximity to green space, forests and health services. The length of time spent at each address could be incorporated into analyses, or location might be explored in relation to wider policy measures or events such as the economic recession.

An early test dataset was supplied to project 2016_003 ‘Economic change and internal population dynamics: an innovative study of new residential mobilities in Scotland’. Results from these analyses have been presented at several seminars and conferences (see list at the bottom of the project page) and there are plans to publish papers.

The online data dictionary has now been updated with Table E10 which contains the raw data and some derived variables. Although many of these cannot be accessed by researchers due to the risk of disclosure (marked as restriction level 2), we are in the process of producing further derived variables such as flags, which users can access. We will soon produce a working paper which will document the data sources and processing of the data, describe the variables in table E10, compare the enumeration postcodes with the postcodes recorded in the NHS data, and provide other information that will be helpful when using and interpreting these data.

For further information see this blog post or contact SLS-DSU at sls@lscs.ac.uk.

Dawn Everington

Published on October 31st, 2017

ADRN conference 2017 – CALLS Hub strand

As our previous post demonstrates, the UK Administrative Data Research Network Annual Research Conference held on 1-2 June 2017 in Edinburgh provided a great showcase for research from the ONS LS, NILS and SLS studies. The conference included a series of sessions sponsored by CALLS Hub, promoting the use of census longitudinal studies and/or population linkage studies to contribute to the substantive themes of health/mortality inequality or migration. Here we round up the excellent presentations given in those sessions.

Session 1G – Premature mortality

Megan Yates: “Incidence of conditions considered amenable to health care in Scotland” – abstract and slides

Ania Zylbersztejn: “Comparison of under-5 mortality in England and in Sweden using electronic birth cohorts from administrative linked data” – abstract and slides

Session 2G – Health inequalities

Sarah Curtis: “Long term illness and reported mental health conditions during recession: exploring evidence from the Scottish Longitudinal Study” – abstract

Jonathan Minton: “Profiling, benchmarking and exploring Age- Period-Cohort patterns in mortality in the Affluent World: examples from Scotland and beyond” – abstract and slides

Genevieve Cezard: “Mortality and ethnicity: minorities fare better than the White Scottish majority in the Scottish Health and Ethnicity Linkage Study (SHELS)” – abstract and slides

Session 3G – Internal migration

Annemarie Ernsten: “How can we better understand internal migration?” – abstract

Brian Foley: “Measuring Internal Migration: Comparing Census and Administrative Data” – abstract and slides

Session 4G – Health & migration (full video below)

Anne Kouvonen: “All-cause mortality by income level in working- age migrants and the majority settled population of Finland: a follow-up from 2001 to 2014” – abstract and video

Kishan Patel: “How well does registry data answer questions about migrant mental health? An analysis of author concerns from a scoping review” – abstract and video

Frances Darlington-Pollock: “The move, the person, or the area? Exploring risk of Cardiovascular Disease in New Zealand” – abstract and video

 

In addition, CALLS Hub were please to sponsor one of the conference Keynote speakers, Prof Johan Mackenbach, Professor of Public Health and chair of the Dept of Public Health at the Erasmus MC in the Netherlands:

Health inequalities in Europe. New insights from comparative studies

Abstract Socioeconomic inequalities in mortality are present in all European countries, but their magnitude and development over time is highly variable. In a series of on-going comparative studies we exploit these variations to identify the macro- and micro-level determinants of these mortality inequalities. In my presentation I will summarize the results of these studies, and relate our findings to current insights into the explanation of health inequalities in modern welfare states.

For more information about the conference please visit adrn2017.net

Published on August 31st, 2017

LS research at the ADRN 2017 conference

The UK Administrative Data Research Network held a very successful conference from 1-2 June 2017 at the Royal College of Surgeons, Edinburgh (find out more at adrn2017.net). You can find information about the CALLS Hub-sponsored sessions in the next post.

Amongst the many fascinating talks and posters at the conference, the SLS, NILS and ONS LS were well represented. Here we have gathered together information about these talks to showcase the range of high quality LS research presented. Click through to read the abstracts and download slides (where available):

Published on August 28th, 2017

CALLS Hub/UK Data Service Webinar recording now available

Fiona Cox, CALLS Hub

Fiona Cox of CALLS Hub recently took part in a joint webinar with the UK Data Service on ‘Flexible individual-level data from the Census: Census micro data and longitudinal studies’, introducing the census-based longitudinal studies (ONS LS, NILS and SLS).

Conventional census outputs take the form of counts of persons, households or other units with particular characteristics. Census microdata, on the other hand, is a flexible form of data which provides a wide range of characteristics for large samples of anonymous census respondents. The data look a lot like the sort of data you would get if you conducted a survey yourself, however they have additional interesting features, most notably that they have unusually large sample sizes.

This introductory webinar discussed the two types of census microdata available for researchers to use:

  • Cross-sectional census microdata (known simply as ‘census microdata’ or samples of anonymised records) which take samples of data from individuals at one point in time, to allow comparisons between groups
  • Longitudinal census microdata held in datasets which link census records over time with other key records such as those from birth and death registrations

We describe some of the key features of the data, show how they can be used in research and explain how users can access the data.

Published on May 31st, 2017

New 1936 Birth Cohort Study

Zengyi Huang, SLS-DSU

The SLS Birth Cohort of 1936 (SLSBC1936) is now available to external researchers. This cohort is structured around the existing SLS. We took the SLS birth date sample from the Scottish Mental Survey of 1947 (a cognitive ability test that included almost all Scottish children born in 1936) and linked it to the 1939 National Register, the NHS Central Register and the SLS. The outcome of the project is a powerful life-course dataset containing information from childhood to old age.

A new SLS Technical Working Paper 7: ‘The Scottish Longitudinal Study 1936 Birth Cohort’ describes the methodology used in creating the SLSBC1936, the quality of linkage and the data included in this cohort. A short description of this data linkage project can be found on the poster: The creation of an administration data based 1936 Birth Cohort Study.

The SLSBC1936 is a general-purpose resource, which is available for researchers via the SLS administration. Anyone interesting in accessing this dataset should contact the SLS-DSU at sls@lscs.ac.uk.

More detail: SLS Technical Working Paper 7

Zengyi Huang

Published on March 30th, 2017

Citation Analysis – Exploring the reach of the Census-based Longitudinal Studies 2010-2016

(download as a PDF 958kB)

Overview

The Northern Ireland Longitudinal Study, ONS Longitudinal Study (England and Wales), and Scottish Longitudinal Study include a vast range of data relevant to many different types of research question. Their combination of administrative, census and health data across time make them a rich and unique set of resources. Examples of the types of research enabled by these features of the LSs include: The role of subject choices in secondary education on further education studies and labour market outcomes and Population characteristics of stigma, condition disclosure and chronic health conditions.

As an exploration of the many ways in which the LSs have been used, CALLS have conducted an analysis of the journal papers produced by LS researchers.

This citation analysis demonstrates the impressive range of academic fields to which LS-based research has contributed in the last 6 years. Research featured in almost 60 journals, and spanned more than 40 Scopus subject categories.

Research based on the LSs is regularly published in top quality international peer reviewed journals such as Demography, the International Journal of Epidemiology and Population, Space and Place. Fifteen papers in the citation analysis were published in journals ranked within the top 5 for their field (articles ranked by SJR Impact Rating for the relevant subject category in the publication year).

LS

n papers published

Total citation count

NILS 29 119 (avg 4.1)
ONS LS 51 264 (avg 5.2)
SLS 32 259 (avg 8.1)
All LSs 106 588 (avg 5.6)

Papers had excellent citation rates indicating the acknowledgement of the unique contributions LS data offer. Papers published within the last 2-3 years were amongst the most highly cited. Eighteen papers had been cited 10 or more times.

The subject areas of papers using the LSs reflect the strengths of the data that they offer: SLS and NILS had a higher proportion of health-related papers, likely due to their excellent linkages with health data. Looking at subject categories for the LSs also reflect these variations: whilst the categories were very similar, ONS LS’s top 5 included ‘Demography’, whereas the SLS and NILS included ‘Health(social science)’.

Overall the analysis shows the valuable contribution of the NILS, ONS LS and SLS to a diverse range of academic fields including medicine, demography, geography, economics, business, psychology, environmental science and more.

Although we only focus on publications in academic journals here, LS research has considerable impact in other formats such as briefing notes, books and presentations to government, and has also formed part of a variety of PhD Theses. The full list of outputs can be explored in our Outputs database.

The raw data for the analysis can be downloaded at the bottom of this page.

Methods

Using the CALLS Hub outputs database a total of 106 published papers from the period January 2010 – May 2016 were identified from the three LSs. It should be noted that whilst CALLS and the RSUs actively solicit LS users to record all outputs, and also conducts literature searches to maximise capture, it is possible that some further papers exist.

All papers published in journals or regularly produced official publications – such as ONS Population Trends – were included. We did not include working papers in this analysis. Citation counts were gathered from Scopus, taking the final counts as of 30 June 2016. Impact Factors were taken from the Scopus project SCImago using the SJR2 indicator.

Results

The LSs combined

Of the 106 papers identified, 16 were from non-peer-reviewed journals such as Population Trends. Four papers used more than one LS for their analysis. (see figure 1)

fig-1

figure 1. Number of published papers per LS, Jan 2010 – May 2016. n = 106

Papers from the three LSs were published in a total of 59 different journals, spanning 41 SCImago Subject Categories in 11 Subject Areas (figure 2). SJR Impact Factors for the papers ranged from 0.128 to 9.893, with an average of 1.577.

figure 2: Percentage of published papers by SCImago Subject Area

figure 2: Number of LS papers published by SCImago Subject Area [CLICK TO ENLARGE]

The 5 most frequent subject categories for LS papers were:

  1. Public Health, Environment & Occupational Health (30 papers)
  2. Medicine(misc) (25 papers)
  3. Geography, Planning & Development (20 papers)
  4. Epidemiology (17 papers)
  5. Health(social science) (16 papers)

The ten most cited papers from the three LSs were:

LS year Authors Paper title Scopus Citation count Journal Journal Impact Factor
SLS 2010 van Ham, M. & Manley, D. The effect of neighbourhood housing tenure mix on labour market outcomes: a longitudinal investigation of neighbourhood effects 64 Journal of Economic Geography 3.050
ONS LS 2013 Clark, D. & Royer, H. The Effect of Education on Adult Mortality and Health: Evidence from Britain 37 American Economic Review 9.893
SLS 2011 Boyle, P., Feng, Z. & Raab, G. Does widowhood increase mortality risk? Comparing different causes of spousal death to test for selection effects 31 Epidemiology 2.325
ONS LS 2010 Grundy, E. & Tomassini, C. Marital history, health and mortality among older men and women in England and Wales 19 BMC Public Health 1.180
NILS, ONS LS & SLS 2010 Young, H., Grundy, E., O’Reilly, D. & Boyle, P. Self-rated health and mortality in the UK: results from the first comparative analysis of the England and Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland Longitudinal Studies 18 Population Trends 0.255
NILS 2010 Connolly, S., O’Reilly, D. & Rosato, M. House value as an indicator of cumulative wealth is strongly related to morbidity and mortality risk in older people: a census-based cross-sectional and longitudinal study 17 International Journal of Epidemiology 2.443
SLS 2010 Boyle, P.J., Popham, F. & Norman, P. The Scottish excess in mortality compared to the English and Welsh: is it a country of residence or country of birth excess? 16 Health & Place 1.199
ONS LS 2011 Riva, M., Curtis, S., Norman, P. Residential mobility within England and urban-rural inequalities in mortality 16 Social Science and Medicine 1.743
ONS LS 2013 Elliot, P., Shaddick, G., Douglass, M. et al Adult Cancers Near High-voltage Overhead Power Lines 16 Epidemiology 2.729
SLS 2012 Bailey, N. How spatial segregation changes over time: sorting out the sorting processes 15 Environment & Planning A 1.446

 Northern Ireland Longitudinal Study

During the period January 2010 to May 2016, a total of 29 journal papers were found which had used NILS data, including one paper which had used all 3 LSs. Five NILS publications appeared journals with top-5 ranked impact factor.

NILS journal papers were published in 18 different journals, spanning 8 SCImago Subject Areas and 22 Subject Categories (see below). SJR Impact Factors for the papers ranged from 0.219 to 4.381, with an average of 1.632.

figure 3: Number of NILS papers published by SCImago Subject Area

figure 3: Number of NILS papers published by SCImago Subject Area [CLICK TO ENLARGE]

The 5 most frequent subject categories for NILS papers were:

  1. Public Health, Environmental & Occupational Health (11 papers)
  2. Geography, Planning & Development (7 papers)
  3. Health(social science) (7 papers)
  4. Epidemiology (6 papers)
  5. Medicine(misc) (5 papers)

The 10 most cited NILS papers were:

year Authors Paper title Scopus Citation count Journal Journal Impact Factor
2010 Young, H., Grundy, E., O’Reilly, D. & Boyle, P. Self-rated health and mortality in the UK: results from the first comparative analysis of the England and Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland Longitudinal Studies 18 Population Trends 0.255
2010 Connolly, S., O’Reilly, D. & Rosato, M. House value as an indicator of cumulative wealth is strongly related to morbidity and mortality risk in older people: a census-based cross-sectional and longitudinal study 17 International Journal of Epidemiology 2.443
2011 McCann, M., Donnelly, M., & O’Reilly, D. Living arrangements, relationship to people in the household and admission to care homes for older people 12 Age and Ageing 1.592
2011 O’Reilly, D., Rosato, M., Catney, G. et al Cohort description: The Northern Ireland Longitudinal Study (NILS) 11 International Journal of Epidemiology 3.116
2011 McCann, M., Grundy, E. & O’Reilly, D. Why is housing tenure associated with a lower risk of admission to a nursing or residential home? Wealth, health and the incentive to keep ‘my home’ 10 Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health 1.575
2011 Connolly, S., O’Reilly, D., Rosato, M. & Cardwell, C. Area of residence and alcohol-related mortality risk: a five-year follow-up study 9 Addiction 2.199
2010 O’Reilly, D. & Rosato, M. Dissonances in self-reported health and mortality across denominational groups in Northern Ireland 6 Social Science and Medicine 1.531
2011 Connolly, S., Rosato, M. & O’Reilly, D. The effect of population movement on the spatial distribution of socio-economic and health status: Analysis using the Northern Ireland mortality study 6 Health & Place 1.344
2014 Stockdale, A. & Catney, G. A Life Course Perspective on Urban–Rural Migration: the Importance of the Local Context 6 Population, Space and Place 1.339
2011 Kinnear, H., Rosato, M., Mairs, A. et al The low uptake of breast screening in cities is a major public health issue and may be due to organisational factors: A Census-based record linkage study 6 The Breast 0.906

ONS LS

During the period in question, 51 journal papers were identified as having been produced from ONS LS projects (including 4 papers which also used other LSs). Of these, 14 appeared in non peer-reviewed journals. Seven papers appeared in top-5 ranked journals.

ONS LS papers appeared in 33 journals, and covered 20 SCImago Subject Categories in 7 Subject Areas. SJR Impact Factors for ONS LS papers ranged from 0.128 to 9.893 with an average of 1.453.

figure 4: Number of ONS LS papers published by SCImago Subject Area

figure 4: Number of ONS LS papers published by SCImago Subject Area [CLICK TO ENLARGE]

The most frequent subject categories in which ONS LS papers appeared were:

  1. Medicine(misc) (14 papers)
  2. Public Health, Environmental & Occupational Health (11 papers)
  3. Epidemiology (8 papers)
  4. Geography, Planning & Development (7 papers)
  5. Demography (7 papers)

The most cited ONS LS papers were:

year Authors Paper title Scopus Citation count Journal Journal Impact Factor
2013 Clark, D. & Royer, H. The Effect of Education on Adult Mortality and Health: Evidence from Britain 37 American Economic Review 9.893
2010 Grundy, E. & Tomassini, C. Marital history, health and mortality among older men and women in England and Wales 19 BMC Public Health 1.180
2010 Young, H., Grundy, E., O’Reilly, D. & Boyle, P. Self-rated health and mortality in the UK: results from the first comparative analysis of the England and Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland Longitudinal Studies 18 Population Trends 0.255
2011 Riva, M., Curtis, S., Norman, P. Residential mobility within England and urban-rural inequalities in mortality 16 Social Science and Medicine 1.743
2013 Elliot, P., Shaddick, G., Douglass, M. et al Adult Cancers Near High-voltage Overhead Power Lines 16 Epidemiology 2.729
2012 Blomgren J., Martikainen P., Grundy E. & Koskinen S. Marital history 1971-91 and mortality 1991-2004 in England & Wales and Finland 14 Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health 1.550
2011 Popham, F., & Boyle, P.J. Is there a ‘Scottish effect’ for mortality? Prospective observational study of census linkage studies 11 Journal of Public Health 0.851
2013 Scott, A.P. & Timæus, I.M. Mortality differentials 1991−2005 by self-reported ethnicity: findings from the ONS Longitudinal Study 10 Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health 1.845
2013 Blackburn, C.M., Spencer, N.J. & Read, J.M. Is the onset of disabling chronic conditions in later childhood associated with exposure to social disadvantage in earlier childhood? A prospective cohort study using the ONS Longitudinal Study for England and Wales 9 BMC Pediatrics 1.086
2012 Riva, M. & Curtis, S. Long term local area employment rates as predictors of individual mortality and morbidity: a prospective study in England spanning more than two decades 9 Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health 1.550
2011 Akinwale, B., Lynch, K., Wiggins, R. et al Work, permanent sickness and mortality risk: a prospective cohort study of England and Wales, 1971-2006 9 Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health 1.575

Scottish Longitudinal Study

During the period January 2010 – May 2016, 32 SLS-based journal papers were identified (including 4 papers which also used other LSs). Of these, 2 appeared in non peer-reviewed journals. Three papers were published in top-5 ranked journals.

The SLS papers were published in 26 different journals, spanning 23 SCImago Subject Categories in 8 Subject Areas. Impact Factors for the papers ranged from 0.226 to 5.667, with an average of 1.6.

figure 5: Percentage of SLS papers published by SCImago Subject Area

figure 5: Percentage of SLS papers published by SCImago Subject Area [CLICK TO ENLARGE]

SLS papers appeared most frequently under the following subject categories:

  1. Public Health, Environmental & Occupational Health (9 papers)
  2. Medicine(misc) (8 papers)
  3. Geography, Planning & Development (6 papers)
  4. Health(social science) (5 papers)
  5. Epidemiology (3 papers)

The 10 most cited SLS papers were:

year Authors Paper title Scopus Citation count Journal Journal Impact Factor
2010 van Ham, M. & Manley, D. The effect of neighbourhood housing tenure mix on labour market outcomes: a longitudinal investigation of neighbourhood effects 64 Journal of Economic Geography 3.050
2011 Boyle, P., Feng, Z. & Raab, G. Does widowhood increase mortality risk? Comparing different causes of spousal death to test for selection effects 31 Epidemiology 2.325
2010 Young, H., Grundy, E., O’Reilly, D. & Boyle, P. Self-rated health and mortality in the UK: results from the first comparative analysis of the England and Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland Longitudinal Studies 18 Population Trends 0.255
2010 Boyle, P.J., Popham, F. & Norman, P. The Scottish excess in mortality compared to the English and Welsh: is it a country of residence or country of birth excess? 16 Health & Place 1.199
2012 Bailey, N. How spatial segregation changes over time: sorting out the sorting processes 15 Environment and Planning A 1.446
2013 Spijker, J. & MacInnes, J. Population ageing: the timebomb that isn’t? 14 BMJ 2.443
2011 Popham, F., Boyle, P., O’Reilly, D. & Leyland, A.H. Selective internal migration. Does it explain Glasgow’s worsening mortality record? 12 Health & Place 1.344
2011 Popham, F., & Boyle, P.J. Is there a ‘Scottish effect’ for mortality? Prospective observational study of census linkage studies 11 Journal of Public Health 0.851
2014 Gaye, A., Marcon, Y., Isaeva, J. et al DataSHIELD: taking the analysis to the data, not the data to the analysis 9 International Journal of Epidemiology 4.353
2013 Kulik, M.C., Menvielle, G., Eikemo, T.A. et al Educational Inequalities in Three Smoking-Related Causes of Death in 18 European Populations 9 Nicotine & Tobacco Research 1.354

Explore the full database of LS outputs

Raw data (Excel, 82kB)

Published on November 29th, 2016

UK LS Roadshows – Cardiff presentations now available

On Friday 18th March we held the largest of our UK LS Roadshows to date and we hope the audience enjoyed the day as much as we did.

The first part of the Roadshow showcased research examples from all three LSs – the Scottish Longitudinal Study, Northern Ireland Longitudinal Study and ONS LS, and you can download slides here:

Pathways between socioeconomic disadvantage and growth in the Scottish Longitudinal Study, 1991-2001 (PDF 4MB)

Dr Richard Silverwood, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Ethnic differences in intragenerational social mobility between 1971 and 2011

Dr Saffron Karlsen, University of Bristol

Are Informal Caregivers in Northern Ireland more likely to suffer from Anxiety and Depression? A Northern Ireland Longitudinal (NILS) Data Linkage-Study

Dr Stefanie Doebler, Queen’s University Belfast

Published on April 27th, 2016

UK LS Roadshows – Bristol presentations now available!

On Nov 10th, our UK LS Roadshow moved to Bristol as part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science.

The first part of our Roadshow showcased some of the different types of research that the ONS LS for England & Wales has been used for, and you can download the slides here:

Family size and educational attainment in England and Wales

Prof Tak Wing Chan, University of Warwick

Overall and Cause-specific Mortality differences by Partnership status in 21st Century England and Wales (PDF 645 kB)

Sebastian Franke, University of Liverpool

Ethnic differences in intragenerational social mobility between 1971 and 2011

Dr Saffron Karlsen, University of Bristol

Published on November 27th, 2015

UK LS Roadshow 2015 – Scottish event presentations available to download!

On October 26th and 28th CALLS Hub hosted two exciting roadshow events in Aberdeen and Glasgow to promote the UK Census-based Longitudinal Studies. The events were well attended and feedback from the audience was very enthusiastic! It was great to be able to share our excitement about the potential of the datasets.

The first part of our Roadshows showcased some of the different types of research that the Scottish Longitudinal Study has been used for, and you can download the slides here:

Protective effects of nurses’ health literacy: evidence from the Scottish Longitudinal Study

Dr Ian Atherton, Edinburgh Napier University

NEETs in Scotland: a longitudinal analysis of health effects of NEET experience (PDF 5MB)

Dr Zhiqiang Feng, University of Edinburgh

Population Ageing in Scotland: Implications for Healthcare Expenditure Projections (PDF 312kB)

Dr Claudia Geue, University of Glasgow

How spatial segregation changes over time: sorting out the sorting processes (PDF 285kB)

Prof Nick Bailey, University of Glasgow

Using the Scottish Longitudinal Study to analyse social inequalities in school subject choice (PDF 766kB)

Prof Cristina Ianelli, University of Edinburgh

Inequalities in young adults’ access to home-ownership in Scotland: a widening gap? (PDF 1MB)

Prof Elspeth Graham, University of St Andrews

Published on November 6th, 2015

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