Risk factors of young people not in education, employment or training (NEET): Longitudinal analyses over a 10 year follow up period

Everington, D., Ralston, K., Feng, Z. & Dibben, C. (2015) Journal of Youth Studies Conference, Copenhagen 31 March - 1 April 2015 [SLS]

Other information:
Abstract:

Background: The high level of young people not in education, employment or training (NEET) has been an important issue in Scotland for over a decade. This analysis follows people who were 6-9 years old at the time of the 1991 Census to the 2001 Census when they were 16-19 years old. This allows us to test whether NEET status in 2001 is associated with individual characteristics and childhood living conditions measured in 1991 and the highest qualification, local area characteristics and whether they had had a teenage pregnancy in 2001.

Data: We use the Scottish Longitudinal Study (SLS) which provides a 5.3% sample of Scotland and is based around the Censuses of 1991, 2001 and 2011. We link Census data for family members and vital event data to these records.

Methods: We apply logistic regression, reporting odds ratios and confidence intervals.

Finding: Many factors were found to be associated with the likelihood of being NEET. The most important of these were teenage pregnancy and having no qualifications. Nearly half of the NEETs had one of these attributes. Living in an area where there was a high level of NEETs was also important. Significant childhood factors were living in rented accommodation, living in a household where either all economically active persons were unemployed or there were no economically active persons and having more than one sibling.

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Output from project: 2013_005

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