Ethnic nationalism or relaxed assimilation? The response of dominant ethnic groups to immigration in the Anglo-Saxon world

Kaufmann, E. (2018) In I. Cote, M. Mitchell & M. Toft (Eds) People Changing Places: New Perspectives on Demography, Migration, Conflict, and the State New York: Routledge [ONS LS]

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Abstract:

Ethnic change is denoted by the plus sign because it energizes ethnic nationalism. Ethnic change stimulates nationalism because the symbolic continuity of the ethnic majority's cultural or physical traits is deemed to have been irrupted. Cultural liberalism refers to ideological alternatives to nationalism such as socialism or liberal cosmopolitanism. All provide transcendent narratives which compete with ethnic nationalism. In the Anglo-Saxon societies considered here, the pitch of ethnic nationalism waxes with ethnic change and wanes with fluidity: boundary shifts, integration, and assimilation. Boundary change differs from assimilation. Whereas assimilation involves individuals intermarrying and taking on the ethnic majority host culture and identity, boundary change occurs when the ethnic majority redefines the criteria of membership to include former outsiders. The melting of boundaries often occurs in a fit of absence of mind, in defiance of government policy, for reasons internal to both majority and minorities.

Available online: People Changing Places: New Perspectives on Demography, Migration, Conflict, and the State
Output from project: 0410030

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